Wednesday, September 02, 2015

MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB GIG - SEPTEMBER 6

Displaying Tom Harrison poster.jpg 
RESTLESS CREATIVITY FROM RISING UK JAZZ STAR AT MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB

This month’s concert at Milestones Jazz Club on Sunday 6 September features a young band led by a supremely talented rising star of the UK jazz scene performing original contemporary jazz of real depth – The Tom Harrison Quartet.

Since 2010, alto saxophonist Tom Harrison has emerged as a musician of note from the thriving pool of young jazz musicians currently making London's jazz scene one of the best in the world.

His band's work never stays in one place - delicate and haunting compositions with gossamer-like melody give way to restless, swinging improvisation full of sharp angles, all with an added punch that only live performance can muster.
Since graduating from the prestigious Trinity College of Music in 2012, Tom has established himself as an award-winning player and composer with a number of bands including his Film Music Project, all mentored by his teacher, ex-Jazz Messengers saxophonist, Jean Toussaint.

His approach is influenced by a wide range of styles and sources - from John Coltrane, Phil Woods and Kurt Rosenwinkel through Velvet Underground and Led Zeppelin to Nick Drake.

Although still young, the quartet's member have already performed around Britain and Europe in the diverse company of the UK's most individual musicians, not all of them jazz - Robert Mitchell, Cleveland Watkiss, M People and The Fall!
This is a band with a commitment to the culture and tradition of jazz and a desire to take it forward into uncharted territories.

The band’s full line-up features Tom Harrison (alto sax), Alex Munk (guitar), Conor Chaplin (double bass) and Dave Hamblett (drums).

Sunday, August 23, 2015

RUPERT'S GALLERY SHOP NEWSLETTER 3 - COLLECTING




Here is the new logo of Rupert's Gallery Shop!

I've been modestly collecting for eight years and I release some items each week to sell - to keep collecting! At the core of my collection are paintings. Often paintings, whether contemporary, modern or antique are in glazed frames. It is important to look at art works out of their frames and remove them from their 'protective' glass window. While paintings or drawings or prints are protected by framing, dirt and damp linger there too.

Often a signature, a date or a title is hidden beneath the lip of the frame, or hidden on the reverse of the painting, so taking works out of frames takes on more significance.

Such an exploration of the painting can also reveal the age of the painting through the materials used and the method of framing. A recent painting I bought was packed into the frame using two copies of the Daily Mirror of 1948, so dating the work is a little easier now.

Buying paintings online can be a relatively inexpensive means of collecting. One prolific art student recently undertook a drawing a day to sell online and this helped fund her course - by a tenner a day, if she was lucky! To me, any original work is better than buying a High Street print produced in their thousands.

Also, increasingly 'high art' that sells for millions no longer tells us about the real stories of human life and our history. What does Damien Hirst's work tell us about ourselves and our times - apart from his own super wealth? Little. 

A painting that features a place, a person, an emotion or a time may only be worth a few pounds,a few hundred pounds, a few thousand pounds but will carry that real worth with it.

Friday, August 21, 2015

Thursday, July 30, 2015

LET ONE THOUSAND AVANT-GARDE PLAYS BLOOM



American poet Mark Halliday and Martin Stannard have collaborated over several years on short (sometimes very short) plays that took an initial inspiration from Kenneth Koch's "One Thousand Avant-Garde Plays." There are well over a hundred now, and several (around 20 or so) of them have been published in American journals.

The latest play is here at International Times.

Friday, July 24, 2015

RUPERT'S GALLERY SHOP Newsletter 2 - DICK ROMYN FEATURED

Welcome to my second Rupert's Gallery Shop Newsletter. Now featured in the shop is a painting by Dick Romyn (1915 to 2007). Dick exhibited his work widely in Europe and, studying in Paris, Braque was his mentor. His Times obituary is here.

Dick was a friend of my father, Tom Mallin, and they met at the short lived Anglo-French Art Centre in the late 1940s. Here is the painting...

 
 


Dick Romyn's work has been sold by leading auction houses with paintings often selling for up to £1,250. His work operates between representation and abstraction, which gives it that continental heart. He did exhibit in London too...


Here is a flyer for an exhibition at the Upper Grosvenor Galleries, probably in the late 1950s, opened by Edward Ardizzone.

More of Romyn's paintings can be found on the BBC's 'Your Paintings' website.

Over the coming weeks and months I will feature a variety of artists whose work should be better known. Prices often include a "best offer," and haulage/shipping and insurance are included in the price.
 

Wednesday, July 22, 2015

LAWRENCE FERLINGHETTI - THE ANVIL OF THE BEAT GENERATION

Lawrence Ferlinghetti is one of my favourite Modern Poets. His 'A Coney Island of The Mind' was a best seller - an opening door between prose and poetry, the personal and the political, the sea and the dirt.

Ferlinghetti ran City Lights Bookshop in San Francisco and set up City Lights Publishers, publishing Ginsberg, Corso and so many more.

For all the needed howling around him, Ferlinghetti was the quiet man of the Beat Generation. He is 96 years old now and still going strong. Two books are coming up charting his life and times as recently reported in The Guardian.

AUGUST 2ND GIG AT MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB FEATURING ZOE GILBY

GIFTED YOUNG SINGER RETURNS TO 
MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB


 
This month’s concert at Milestones Jazz Club on Sunday 2 August features the return by popular demand of an exciting and gifted young singer from Newcastle making her mark on the UK jazz scene – Zoe Gilby and The Andy Champion Trio.

Zoe Gilby last appeared at Milestones in 2013 when she entertained a large audience with accessible, exciting music without losing the deeper subtleties of a fine jazz musician.


Z
oe has already been praised by Courtney Pine as deserving of wider recognition when he played her debut CD on his BBC Radio 2 show.

Zoe’s is a versatile voice, which mixes great jazz technique and a healthy dose of the blues with a deeply expressive and agile quality on a wide range of material - from George Gershwin and Duke Ellington to Joni Mitchell and Pink Floyd.

A childhood steeped in jazz means that her many influences are clear - not only great vocalists like Sarah Vaughan, Carmen McRae, Nancy Wilson and Anita O'Day but also revered instrumentalists like Dexter Gordon, Chet Baker and John Coltrane.

"I was brought up on listening to jazz", says Zoe, "I have had this passion passed on to me from my father who worked professionally as a jazz trumpet player and arranger for over 40 years."

In 2007 she released her debut CD, ‘Now That I Am Real’, followed in 2010 by 'Looking Glass' which has subsequently broadcast on radio stations across Europe and the US.

While still young, Zoe had already performed with respected musicians like Louis Stewart and Jim Mullen, at international jazz festivals around the UK and at prestigious venues like Ronnie Scott’s Club in London and m
ore recently in China, Finland and Ukraine

Zoe’s husband and long-time accompanist, the endlessly resourceful double bass player Andy Champion, will lead sympathetic support on a repertoire of American songbook classics, modern jazz standards and originals from her latest CD, ‘Twelve Stories’.

The band’s full line-up features Zoe Gilby (vocals), Andy Champion (double bass), Phil Brooke (guitar) and Brian McAllister (drums).
 
 
All Milestones gigs are held on the first Sunday of every month and take place at Hotel Hatfield, Esplanade, Lowestoft with the doors opening at 8pm.

Admission - £7 / £6 (concession).

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

GREAT MAIDEN SPEECH BY PARLIAMENT'S YOUNGEST MP

Mhairi Black is twenty years old, the youngest MP in The Commons, who has delivered a blistering maiden speech. Though she is a Scottish National Party MP, all her biting words against Tory austerity illustrate her Socialism.

Norwich South's Labour MP Clive Lewis also delivered a brilliant maiden speech. He too is a Socialist.

They should get together and really rattle the cages of Parliament.

Friday, July 10, 2015

RUPERT'S GALLERY SHOP Newsletter 1

RUPERT'S GALLERY SHOP - Newsletter 1

I have started making substantial changes to Rupert's Gallery Shop - my eBay site. Over the coming weeks it will begin to look more like a gallery, purveying affordable art with paintings, sculpture, prints, etc. from £1 to £5,000 - and usually closer to a pound.

Alongside my own work there will be a few exciting pieces from my late parents Tom and Muriel Mallin. Presently in the Gallery is Muriel Mallin's Beth Catto's Garden at £250.



This expressive oil painting was created in 1986 close to Sudbury in West Suffolk.

Also on offer is a large, signed lithographic print by the American artist Joseph Pennell 1837 to 1926.

Pennell worked on a number of prints of the Building of the Panama Canal, the American/British adventure, 1903 to 1914. This print is priced at nearly £60.


Finally, I have a number of my art in boxes up for sale. This one is priced at £30 and is titled 'Behind the Door.'



Many items are sent post free in Britain and 100 art works are presently in the shop, alongside other items.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

POTATOES by RUPERT MALLIN

They want the arms and legs off you.
They want your eyes.
They want your tongue.
They think they have your mind.

They crack your fingers because they are eyes.
They gouge out your eyes because they're all tongue.
Old or young they want your tongue.

This is why they want the arms and legs off you.
Because of you.
Because you-are-you.
They want the arms and legs off you.

We shake. We wake.
We creak with secrets
As they feed us biscuits
Sweeter than cake.
We're shaken to the core.

They want the arms and legs off you but Shh...
You and I are Us, because

"One potato, two potato, three potato - MORE"

"One potato, two potato, three potato - MORE"

 

JULY 5TH GIG AT MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB - THE ART OF THE TRIO



EXPLORING A NEGLECTED CORNER OF JAZZ AT MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB
This month's concert at Milestones Jazz Club on Sunday 5 July features a new band exploring a neglected corner of jazz - The Art of The Trio.

From Nat 'King' Cole and Oscar Peterson to Jimmy Giuffre and Tal Farlow, jazz has a rich tradition of that unusual format - the band without drums.
 
And now three of East Anglia's most respected jazz musicians have formed The Art of The Trio to explore the opulent harmonies and contrasting textures of the drummer-less trio through a specially selected programme of standards and overlooked gems.
 
Guitarist Phil Brooke, pianist Simon Brown and double bassist Owen Morgan have long been the first choice of both local musicians and visiting stars for their tasteful, intelligent playing and sympathetic accompaniment.

Here they have a rare opportunity to perform the 
winding lines of past arrangements by the likes of Nat 'King' Cole and Red Norvo, and new original arrangements by Phil Brooke.

Even with well known songs, the out-of-the-ordinary instrumentation leads to music that can be both complimentary and excitingly competitive.

The band’s full line-up features Phil Brooke (guitar), Simon Brown (piano) and Owen Morgan (double bass).

All Milestones gigs are held on the first Sunday of every month and take place at Hotel Hatfield, Esplanade, Lowestoft with the doors opening at 8pm.

Admission - £7 / £6 (concession).
 
 

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

STORMING MAIDEN SPEECH BY NORWICH MP CLIVE LEWIS

A maiden speech in the House of Commons is meant to be non-controversial so that the new member of parliament knows his/her place.

What a breath of fresh air was the combative speech by new boy Clive Lewis today, MP for Norwich. Much of his venom was aimed at the Inspiration Trust, which looks likely to turn Hewett High School into an academy - as part of its ever expanding take-over schools chain. Details are in today's Guardian

Academies are the means of privatising schools. Most high schools in Norfolk are now academies, whereby the head teacher is said to have autonomy over the budget of the school, rather than the local education authority. Based on price-per-pupil - as is capitalist logic - academies have to keep expanding to create a profit (however quasi that profit is).

When the Berlin Wall fell to my cheers, state held assets were stripped for the oligarchs. What's the difference with privatisation?

And in the academy process not a thought about the happiness of the children in the process - they and their parents will not be consulted, nor the teachers, nor the wider community. "Consultation" is some sort of religious confessional, not a democratic process.

There are four ways academy schools can do this: a)increase the number of students by poaching them from other, nearby schools; b) become part of an expanding chain of schools; c) become a very specialist or international school (attracting other private funds); and d) by selling off assets of the LEA school taken over by the Academy.

Clive Lewis' argument with Inspiration Trust centred on the latter "robber baron" options.

In its entirety, his maiden speech in the Commons shone because it inspired others around him - particularly Diane Abbot MP. Didn't I mention - Clive Lewis is the new, young Labour MP for South Norwich, who brilliantly supports Jeremy Corbyn as the left wing candidate in the Labour leadership race.

More important than all is that he supports The People's Assembly march on June 20th in London. Four coaches or more are going from Norwich.

They say left wing MPs enter parliament to change the world but end up changed into establishment zombies by the parliamentary club. Prove me wrong Clive!
 

Sunday, May 31, 2015

PETER WYLIE, EXHIBITION OF PAINTINGS, MERCHANT HOUSE GALLERY, LOWESTOFT, UNTIL JUNE 20th

I attended the opening of a remarkable exhibition of paintings by Peter Wylie at the Merchant House Gallery, Lowestoft, last week. Remarkable because the paintings are of virtually unpeopled buildings, specifically the great modernist social housing complexes of the 20th Century.

The paintings can be viewed on Peter Wylie's website

Corbusier, Zogolovitch, Erno Goldfinger and others are represented through specific paintings of high rise structures - given their human dimension by the artist (a light left on, a washing line, etc).

As a counterpoint, Peter Wylie includes paintings of a local project in Loddon designed by architects Tayler and Green - a social housing bungalow project.

The tower block was not played off against the single storey complex because both are within the Modernist framework of changing the World towards a housing equality. That is, architects had a huge part in Modernism - not just in terms of design but in shaping society.

Peter Wylie's paintings starkly illustrate what the neo-liberalism of the present is turning its back on. In London today, buildings erected are banks to invest in. Indeed, the super rich have moved their money into central city skyscrapers to provide better interest returns than the banks.

The exhibition runs until June 20th and shouldn't be missed.

NOTHIN' AIN'T WORTH NOTHIN'

 
 
 
"Nothin' ain't worth nothin' but it's free" Where's that from?

With a new computer I hope to bring lots of exciting things here very soon - from factual stories and poetry to an array of visuals. Back soon...

Thursday, May 28, 2015

MILESTONES GIG JUNE 7: THE BUTTON BAND



THE DISTINCTIVE SOUND OF THE BUTTON BAND AT MILESTONES JAZZ CLUB

This month’s concert at Milestones Jazz Club on Sunday 7 June features the distinctive sound of a new and original band comprised of the best up and coming London jazz musicians – The Button Band.

Andrew Button is a guitarist and composer leading his London band on it's first UK tour through originals that reflect the influence of Bill Frisell, John Scofield and Loose Tubes.


Sometimes playful, sometimes melancholy, always quietly grooving, The Button Band play contemporary jazz, highlighting Andrew's free-flowing, lyrical style, including the flavours of not just modern jazz but also folk and country music.

Andrew graduated from the Middlesex University jazz course under distinguished trumpeter Chris Batchelor, studied in New York with guitarist Brad Shepic before moving back to the UK, ensconcing himself on the London jazz scene.
 
There he formed The Button Band in 2014 as an outlet for his flourishing composition and arrangement skills, keeping the music fresh and forward-looking with tenor sax maestro Andy Woolf, creative drummer Jon Ormaston and the original, sought-after double bassist Dave Mannington.
 
The band's collective CV shows the diversity of their musical interests working with players as feted as Bobby McFerrin and Mark-Anthony Turnage, Peter King and Kenny Wheeler.

This concert is the only East Anglian date on a UK tour to promote the release of the band's eponymous debut album.

The band’s full line-up features Andrew Button (guitar), Andy Woolf (tenor saxophone), Dave Manington (double bass) and Jon Ormaston (drums).
All Milestones gigs are held on the first Sunday of every month and take place at Hotel Hatfield, Esplanade, Lowestoft with the doors opening at 8pm.

Admission - £7 / £6 (concession).

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

SIMON ARMITAGE VERSUS FRIDGE POETRY


It isn't Simon Armitage's popularity which puts many of us off his poetry, as this Guardian article suggests, but its lack of excitement and its increasing lifelessness.

There's a fantastic picture of what can be built with Meccano on the front of the box but when the lid is lifted our dreams turn to, well, Meccano.

Friday, May 22, 2015

POET KENNETH KOCH - INSPIRING TEACHER

American poet Kenneth Koch was an inspiring teacher

If only we had this approach in Britain, rather than the tick box analysis of texts that is becoming the norm.

With thanks to Martin Stannard for this link.